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Space, Time, Form

CROIZAT, L. (1964). Space, Time, Form: The Biological Synthesis. Published by the author, Caracas.

  • Introduction, pp. i-xix
  • Chapter I, pp. 1-50: On Rudiments
    • pp. 1-4 A) On method
    • pp. 4-15 B) On patterns of distribution, in general
    • pp. 15-32 C) On patterns of distribution, in particular
    • pp. 32-50 D) A brief survey of "transatlantic" and "amphi-atlantic" dispersal
  • Chapter II, pp. 51-87: Mostly on Dispersal vs Geology
    • pp. 51-57 A) Preliminaries
    • pp. 57-74 B) On geosynclines and dispersal
    • pp. 74-87 C) Tethys' necessary counterpart: Gondwana
  • Chapter III, pp. 88-176: How the Panbiogeographic Method Works
    • pp. 88-91 A) Preliminaries
    • pp. 91-102 B) Cotton (Gossypium) in the New World
    • pp. 103-122 C) The dispersal of Pedilanthus (Euphorbiaceae)
    • pp. 123-137 D) On the morphogeny and morphology of Pedilanthus
    • pp. 137-145 E) The dispersal of Lycium
    • pp. 146-149 F) A very short note on Caribbean and Antillean dispersal
    • pp. 149-153 G) A glance at dispersal in the Pacific
    • pp. 153-176 H) The "MacPherson-Macleay Overlap", and Australian biogeography
  • Chapter IV, pp. 177-346: On Form-making
    • pp. 177-189 A) Preliminaries
    • pp. 189-198 B) On vicariism as a fundamental manifestation of evolution in Space through Time by Form
    • pp. 198-216 C) How and why Vicariism?
    • pp. 216-220 D) On age and types of Form-making in general
    • pp. 220-225 E) Some intresting cases of weedy dispersal
    • pp. 226-229 F) On "means of dispersal"
    • pp. 230-247 G) On the evolution of the flora of the high mountains of Madagascar
    • pp. 247-259 H) On mountains and islands, or: the more it changes, the more it remains the same
    • pp. 259-268 I) On the dispersal of Crepis; what is "primitive"?
    • pp. 268-287 J) On certain aspects of Form-making in Southern South Africa
    • pp. 287-313 K) Taxogeny in Ericaceae Ericoideae
    • pp. 313-328 L) Taxogeny in Quails(Aves, Phasianidae Phasianinae, in part)
    • pp. 328-335 M) The Robber Flies (Asilidae) of the world, and their dispersal
    • pp. 335-346 N) Lyman B. Smith's expert advice on how to wreck a science of dispersal with a minimum of print
      • a) The dispersal of Velloziaceae, pp. 336-433
      • b) Smith's "phytogeography", pp. 343-346
  • Chapter V, pp. 347-404: On the Origin of the Angiospermae
    • pp. 347-358 A) Preliminaries
    • pp. 358-365 B) The origin of the Angiospermae, in time
    • pp. 366-369 C) The origin of the Angiospermae, in space
    • pp. 369-399 D) The origin of the Angiospermae, by form
    • pp. 398-399 E) Summary on the origin of the Angiospermae
    • pp. 399-404 F) Maheshwari's expert advice how to misunderstand angiospermy at its root
  • Chapter VI, pp. 405-409: On certain aspects of zoological evolution, with stress on the origin of the bird feather and avian flight
    • pp. 405-436 A) Preliminaries
    • pp. 436-457 B) On the feather, in particular
    • pp. 457-481 C) Gryphaea, the oyster that did commit suicide
    • pp. 481-499 D) Evolutionism in general from mollusks and birds to mammals: what, finally, Empedocles said and Aristotle wrote
  • Chapter VII, pp. 500-591: What is the species?
    • pp. 500-505: A) Preliminaries
    • pp. 505-515: B) Taxogeny and "species"-making in Titmice (Parus; Aves)
    • pp. 516-521: C) Taxogeny and "species"-making in Flycatchers (Terpsiphone/Tchitrea; Aves)
    • pp. 521-564: D) The species of Oenothera (Onagraceae (Oenotheraceae); Angiospermae)
    • pp. 564-591: E) On the taxogeny and race-making, sensu amplissimo, of Homo sapiens
  • Chapter VIII, pp. 592-706: On Darwin, and on Darwinism as doctrine and thought in history and actuality
    • pp. 592-594 A) Preliminaries
    • pp. 594-609 B) Darwin of the Voyage of the Beagle vs. Darwin of The Origin of Species
    • pp. 609-631 C) An appraisal of Darwin's "geographic distribution" in the Voyage of the Beagle
    • pp. 631-641 D) A reappraisal of Darwin's own "geographic distribution" according to The Origin of Species
    • pp. 641-656 E) On Natural Selection: nonsense, "mechanicism", and "teleology" vs. biology
    • pp. 656-689 F) On orthogeny and, in general, evolutionism
    • pp. 689-704 G) A reappraisal of Darwinism as a doctrine, and Charles Darwin as a man and as a figure
    • pp. 704-706 H) On Darwinism as a "spiritual" and "ethical" question
  • Chapter IX, pp. 707-726: The Conclusions
  • Addenda, pp. 727-822
    • pp. 727-771 I) On the Genetical Theory of Natural Selection of Ronald A. Fisher
      • a) Introductory remarks, pp. 727-728
      • b) Fisher vs. Darwin, pp. 728-734
      • c) Fisher's "mathematics", pp. 734-739
      • d) On mutation, pp. 739-771
      • i) Introduction, pp. 739-744
      • ii) On homoeosis, pp. 744-756
      • iii) Why five fingers to my hand, and five petals to a wild rose, pp. 757-763
      • iv) On mimicry, pp. 763-771
    • pp. 772-794 II) Catholicism and Panbiogeography
      • a) Introductory remarks, pp. 772-773
      • b) A summary of Padre Bartina's conclusions, pp. 773-773
      • c) On "transformism" and its implication from the scientific viewpoint, pp. 774-777
      • d) On certain physical phenomena, pp. 777-778
      • e) On "monogenism", pp. 778-787
      • f) The Conclusions, pp. 787-790
      • Note, pp. 790-794
    • pp. 795-796 III) Once again, Gryphaea, or the Oyster that did commit suicide
    • pp. 797-808 IV) Melville, Meeuse, and Croizat on Angiospermy
      • a) Melville's "Gonophyll", pp. 799-805
      • b) Meeuse's "Adaptation", pp. 805-807
      • c) The Conclusions, pp. 807-808
    • pp. 809-822 V) Gavin de Beer's own Darwiniana
  • Indices, pp. 823-881
    • To the Reader, pp. 823-824
    • I) Chapters and Sections, pp. 825-827
    • II) Figures, pp. 828-830
    • III) Persons, pp. 831-834
    • IV) Animals, pp. 835-839
    • V) Plants, pp. 840-844
    • VI) Geography, pp. 845-850
    • VII) Things and Concepts, pp. 851-876
    • VIII) Index to Addenda, pp. 877-881
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