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Principia Botanica

CROIZAT, L. (1961). Principia Botanica. Published by the author, Caracas.

  • Introduction, pp. i-xiii
  • Chapter I, pp. 1-24: The Conclusions
  • Chapter II, pp. 25-133: The dispersal of the carnivorous plants
  • Chapter III, pp. 134-256: The morphogeny of the carnivorous plants
    • pp. 134-225: Soma and vegetative characters
    • pp. 225-248: The floral organs
    • pp. 248-256: The ancestral carnivorous form
  • Chapter IV, pp. 257-352: Rudiments of floral morphogeny and of systematic botany
    • pp. 258-287: The Amentiferae
    • pp. 287-300: The Hammamelidaceae
    • pp. 300-308: Leaving the Hammamelidaceae behind
    • pp. 308-317: On placentation and some related issues in flower-making
    • pp. 317-323: Simple thoughts on floral morphogeny
    • pp. 324-346: The Cornaceae and their allies
    • pp. 346-352: Turpin's own "phycostème"
  • Chapter V, pp. 353-470: On different aspects of systematics, morphogeny, and phylogeny, with some slight stress upon the first
    • pp. 356-384: The "ranalian" flower
    • pp. 384-391: The Corystospermaceae and angiospermy
    • pp. 391-399: The ovule/ovary of Gnetum
    • pp. 399-414: On some interesting carpic structures
    • pp. 414-449: On the affinities of the Celastraceae, Flacourtiaceae, et caetera
      • a) pp. 414-415: General notes and comments
      • b) pp. 415-423: On the Thymelaeaceae just as a starting point
      • c) pp. 423-431: Why and how great many "good" pretty families of formal systematics had better be understood by phylogeny as a single one
      • d) pp. 431-435: About that frightful family, Flacourtiaceae
      • e) pp. 435-438: Where the carnivorous plants briefly return to stage
      • f) pp. 439-442: On that "mystery of mysteries", meaning, in plain words, on the "origin of monocotyledons"
      • g) pp. 442-444: A few words of summary, and a word of warning
      • h) pp. 444-449: What can palynology really do for systematic botany?
    • pp. 449-470: From Rosaceae to "Terebinthaceae"
  • Chapter VI, pp. 471-632: Thoughts on "flower-making", with notes and a résumé on certain aspects of anatomy, embryology, and cytology
    • pp. 472-491: The cyathium of the Euphobiae; and enquiry into the meaning of terms
    • pp. 491-507: The malvaceous flower, the the "solid carpel"
    • pp. 507-534: Notes on the stamen and, by implication, the staminode and petal
    • pp. 534-546: How many stamens does it take to make up a carpel?
    • pp. 546-556: On peloria, and its relationship to flower-making
    • pp. 556-565: On the flower of Aconitum, zygomorphy, and torsion
    • pp. 565-569: On nothing bigger than a peanut, and on nothing smaller than botany
    • pp. 569-574: On the morphological nature of the floral receptacle: a study in quibbling
    • pp. 574-584: Rockbottom on the angiospermous flower; or, making that simple which is surely not complicate
    • pp. 584-609: Observations on placentation and, of course, on the "classical theory of flower"
    • pp. 609-615: On embryology and systematics
    • pp. 616-632: On cytology, biogeography, and classification
  • Chapter VII, pp. 633-761: On phyllotaxis and on symmetry: I. Stressing a fitting algorithm
    • pp. 661-670: Richards' phyllotaxis
    • pp. 670-672: Church's phyllotaxis
    • pp. 672-678: Plantefol's phyllotaxis
    • pp. 678-684: The vegetative shoot of Linum
    • pp. 684-691: The vascularization of the flower of Austrobaileya
    • pp. 691-692: Bundle-linkage in the shoot of Heracleum
    • pp. 692-699: Vascular development in relation to phyllotaxis in Sequoia
    • pp. 699-707: The "crazy" phyllotaxis of Helianthus
    • pp. 707-712: The "crazy" phyllotaxis of Ailanthus
    • pp. 712-722: The "crazy" phyllotaxis of Costus and the like, including a note on "prophylls"
    • pp. 722-732: The "crazy" phyllotaxis of the succulent plants
    • pp. 732-750: The floral vernation of Parnassia, with notes on Stellaria
    • pp. 750-761: The areole of the Cactaceae
  • Chapter VIII, pp. 762-882: On phyllotaxis and on symmetry: II. Stressing basing architecture from "leaf" and "shoot" to cell
    • pp. 762-780: On the essential symmetry of the main axis
    • pp. 780-791: On the tendril of the Vitaceae
    • pp. 791-802: On the tendril of the Cucurbitaceae
    • pp. 802-817: On the experimental work on phyllotaxis by M. Snow & R. Snow
    • pp. 817-828: On Wardlaw's phyllotaxis and experimental morphology
    • pp. 928-830: On spiral grain in timber
    • pp. 831-847: On the phyllotaxis of the capitulum
    • pp. 847-851: Sectorial polyploidy and phyllotaxis in Vaccinium
    • pp. 851-854: On the phyllotaxis of Begonia
    • pp. 854-876: How does the cell cut?
    • pp. 877-882: Some conclusions on phyllotaxis and symmetry
  • Chapter IX, pp. 883-978: On what is of the stipule and of the leaf. I: Mainly on general cases
    • pp. 928-938: The frond of the Pteridophyta and Cycadaceae and its stipule
    • pp. 938-958: The coniferous foliage
    • pp. 958-978: The nature and doings of the "stipular sheath"
  • Chapter X, pp. 979-1095: On what is of the stipule and of the leaf. II. Mainly on particular cases
    • pp. 979-986: The axial growth of Chamaesyce
    • pp. 986-1005: The monocotyledonous leaf
    • pp. 1006-1006: The inflorescence of Chrysalidocarpus
    • pp. 1006-1021: Does foliar dimorphism exist also in the dicotyledons?
    • pp. 1021-1028: "Experimental morphology" on the frond of Lemna
    • pp. 1028-1037: On epiphylly and related subjects, particularly hypoclades
    • pp. 1037-1043: On trichomoids
    • pp. 1043-1049: On the "urns" of Dischidia
    • pp. 1049-1053: The "saccate bracts" of the Marcgraviaceae
    • pp. 1054-1060: On Treub's "Plantes à crochets", and concluding thoughts concerning epiphylly, hypoclades, trichomoids, ursn, saccate bracts, etc.
    • pp. 1060-1069: The cataphylls and stipules of Quercus, with notes on Casuarina, microphylls and macrophylla
    • pp. 1069-1083: Leaf, carpel, and "gland" at rockbottom
    • pp. 1083-1095: The "stipules" of Cecropia and Ricinus
  • Chapter IX, pp. 1096-1149: On the root, monocotyledony, and dicotyledony
    • pp. 1096-1121: On the root
    • pp. 1121-1149: What is the difference between monocotyledony and dicotyledony?
  • General Addenda, pp. 1150-1746 (1821)
    • pp. 1150-1161: The dispersal of the Cunoniaceae and the "Theory of Hologenesis"
    • pp. 1161-1166: The systematic position of Psiloxylon: Psiloxylaceae fam.nov.
    • pp. 1166-1174: Money, Bailey & Swamy on the Monimiaceae
    • pp. 1174-1188: The making up of the European flora
    • pp. 1188-1211: Cultivated plants and "weeds"
    • pp. 1211-1229: What about "Gondwana"? I.
    • pp. 1229-1255: What about "Gondwana"? II.
    • pp. 1256-1274: Notes on the dispersal of the Moraceae in general and Ficus in particular
    • pp. 1275-1277: Martens on the leaf
    • pp. 1277-1279: On "sexualization"
    • pp. 1279-1282: How truly terminal is the inflorescence of Gnetum? A comment about what looks, but is not
    • pp. 1282-1302: Hooker vs. Darwin by Turrill
    • pp. 1303-1341: A primer in nomenclature: Notes on the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, 1956, in general, with stress on the subject of "Typification"
    • pp. 1341-1344: Is Kalanchoe estipulate and thornless?
    • pp. 1344-1354: An enquiry into the limits of concept. I. The morphology and affinities of Scyphostegia
    • pp. 1354-1367: An enquiry into the limits of concept. II. The "flowers" of Welwitschia
    • pp. 1367-1372: How really old are "quite modern" phytogeography and zoogeography?
    • pp. 1372-1375: On the laticiferous system: Some literature, and passing notes
    • pp. 1375-1377: On the nexus between time and space, "age and area" in dispersal
    • pp. 1377-1382: An additional comment on Datura
    • pp. 1382-1406: The "origins" of Corn (Zea mays). I. General notes
    • pp. 1406-1410: The "origins" of Corn (Zea mays). II. "Races of maize in Cuba"
    • pp. 1410-1411: The leaf of Philesiaceae
    • pp. 1411-1451: On the European "Ice Ages", in general. I. Holdhaus' own version
    • pp. 1451-1490: On the European "Ice Ages", in general. II. Considerations on different main aspects of form-making and translation in space
      • 1) First Case: pp. 1452-1480
      • 2) Second Case: pp. 1480-1489
      • 3) Third Case: pp. 1489-1490
    • pp. 1490-1504: On the European "Ice Ages", in general. III. On the "concepts" of "Massif de Refuge" and "Centre d'Attraction"
    • pp. 1054-1524: A glance at the biogeography of the Aegean Region
    • pp. 1524-1534: On the dispersal of Secale and Hordeum, with notes on the latter's epiphyllous lemma
    • pp. 1534-1550: A report on the current status of a science of time and space as basic factors of evolution. I. Phytogeography in Italy, A.D. 1945
    • pp. 1550-1684: A report on the current status of a science of time and space as basic factors of evolution. II. Zoogeography in the U.S.A., A.D. 1960 (Note: pp.1684-1687)
    • pp. 1687-1695: On "The Natural Philosophy of Plant Form" of Agnes Arber
    • pp. 1695-1704: A comment on ovular zygomorphy and transference of function
    • pp. 1074-1723: Phytogeography old and new: Gams vs. Croizat, with a pointed appraisal (See added Note, p. 1820)
    • pp. 1723-1743: The origin of the Angiospermae: Takhtajian vs. Croizat, Croizat vs. Scott, Barghoorn & Leopold, etc.
    • pp. 1744-1752: The Indices: Introductory Notes, Chapters and Sections, Figures
    • pp. 1753-1759: Index: Persons
    • pp. 1760-1770: "" : Plants
    • pp. 1771-1773: "" : Animals
    • pp. 1774-1780: "" : Geography
    • pp. 1781-1794: "" : Organs
    • pp. 1795-1817: "" : Concepts A (Scientific)
    • pp. 1817-1819: "" : Concepts B (General)
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