Other Authors

(..) I imagine, that Croizat is destined to achieve some measure of heroic popularity in Latin America, not all of it, perhaps, for the best reasons-much in contrast to the sorry history to date of the reception of his published works by the scientific establishment in North America, a reception that is best described as stony silence.
-- Gareth Nelson, Systematic Zoology 26: 450 (1977)
Many aspects of Croizat's method and approach have not even been appreciated and discussed, let alone sufficiently understood, by those who consider his methodology redundant.
-- Robin Craw, Systematic Zoology 31: 315 (1982)
True Croizat's style is lively and vigorous, and ruthlessly uncompromising in criticism of those with whom he disagreed. For these very human errors he has been much criticized by those for whom science is an occupation rather than a passion. It is because his books are intense and ardent conversations on the development of methods for investigating biogeographic and systematic problems that they will live. Pan-biogeographic methodology and synthesis is here to stay.
-- Robin Craw, Tuatara 27: 13 (1984)
A 'science of life' involves an elaboration of the possible meanings of a 'life of science'.
-- Robin Craw & Michael Heads, Rivista di Biologia - Biology Forum 81: 515 (1988)
Use of conceptual space of panbiogeography cannot be made while there are mental blocks in place. These blocks are nothing more than lack of imagination, an inability to conceptualise metaphors complex enough to describe the life process: these blocks are, let's face it, nothing more than barriers to the use of intelligence.
-- Frank Climo, Rivista di Biologia - Biology Forum 81: 541 (1988)
Biological phenomena manifest themselves through reiteration, repetition, replication and reproduction. Nothing significant in biology happens only once. Whether in space (biogeography), time (evolution) or form (genetics, morphology) biological structure is built up by the same thing being repeated, once, twice, or many times.
-- Michael Heads, Journal of Biogeography 31: 1883 (2004)